Categories
Sigulda

1. Promoting entrepreneurship in Sigulda Castle Complex

Implementation Challenges:

  • Ensuring the integrated approach in the delivery of the strategy & their related actions/projects
  • Maintaining involvement of local stakeholders and organising decision-making for delivery
  • Setting up Public Private Partnerships for delivery

Summary

The city of Sigulda (LV) has developed an Arts and Crafts quarter in the old Castle Complex. Workshops representing various traditional crafts are open to public and intend to provide a “hands on” experience where visitors can produce their own pieces. The main goal is to show how the valorisation of sites can not only attract new visitors but also promote entrepreneurship and job creation.

Solutions offered

A previously degraded area has been turned into a lively part of the city by attracting local businesses and craftsmen to reside in the renovated spaces. Smart selection of both the Castle Complex residents and the activities that together make a good mix of attractions interesting to locals as well as visitors thus creating a constant flow of people and keeping the place alive.

Solution to empty spaces and maintenance costs – restoration of cultural monuments is very expensive; therefore, use of public money can only be justified if the restored spaces are used and at least the maintenance costs are covered through the usage – it can be income through ticket sales or rental cost. In case of Sigulda one part of the renovated spaces is all rented out to creative local businesses and the other part – the New Castle – will be opened to public providing new services – an interactive exposition, a wedding hall, an exhibition space, and the income of these newly created services will cover the maintenance cost of the cultural monument.

Building on the sustainable and integrated approach

The work on the Development Strategy of Sigulda Castle Complex 2013 – 2018 ensured a sustainable and integrated approach from the very start of the development process of Sigulda Castle Complex. All the stakeholders were involved and listened to before taking the final decision of which direction to take back in 2012. The process has resulted in a revitalised area opened to public were maintenance costs are covered by different private users of the buildings.

The tourism season in Sigulda is summer and the first part of fall when there is a natural flow of visitors attracted by beautiful nature that surrounds the Castle Complex. However, for small businesses to stay alive there is an income necessary throughout the year. Therefore, the smart selection of creative businesses that are complementary to each other and provide hands on experiences is crucial. During the low season these provide educational opportunities to school children and families. Other type of complementary businesses – co-working space, photo studio, etc., and events that are organised also in low season for the local public, like skating ring in winter, ensure there are people visiting and using the space throughout the year.

Based on a participatory approach

The project has certainly built on the participatory approach through ULG meetings, which has played a role in listening to stakeholders needs and ideas. There are also weekly Sigulda Development Agency meetings with the entrepreneurs residing in the Castle Complex where day-to-day information is exchanged. Entrepreneurs are invited to participate in all the cultural events that are organised in the Castle Complex.

What difference has it made? How did the result indicator shift?

There are around 30 newly created work spaces in Castle Complex right now, and the number will increase as soon as all the spaces are rented out. Also there is an overall increase of number of visitors in Castle Complex and an increase in time they spend there.

Why should other EU cities use it?

To find a contemporary use of their cultural heritage which justifies spending of public money in renovation and maintenance processes. Also to support and encourage the local craftsmanship in order to retain uniqueness and value of different cultures in a globalised world.

Key Facts and Figures:

Start and end dates of case example:

June 2016 – October 2018

Date of preparation of this case example:

2.11.2018.

Who prepared the case example?

Sigulda Municipality

Budget:

The whole revitalisation of the Castle Complex (all the buildings including the medieval castle) has cost about 10 ml euros. The decision to promote entrepreneurship by smart selection of local businesses and craftsmen hasn’t cost anything to the Municipality. Quite contrary, the maintenance costs are covered by entrepreneurs. The budget for the reconstruction of the last three buildings that are solely rented out to entrepreneurs was about 660 000 euros.

Extra information and hyperlinks:

http://tourism.sigulda.lv/news/3663/


Categories
Intercommunale-Leiedal

2. Using momentum as a lever for a new governance model at the Transfo heritage site

Case example by Leiedal, representing the 13 cities and municipalities of the Kortrijk region.

Case example Summary

The Transfo heritage site is subject to a growing number of initiatives and dynamics, which obviously is a good thing. One of the latest announcements is the development of an indoor climbing hall at Transfo, a public-private investment of about 2 million euros. These types of investments create a snowball effect, in the sense that they fuel and accelerate the enthusiasm to be part of the Transfo story.

The project partners, however, have difficulties in managing these dynamics: the current governance framework shows traces of wear. To fully embrace these dynamics and opportunities, the partners need an agile, collaborative, integrated and sustainable governance framework. INT-HERIT offered the window of opportunity to invest in the development of this new model.

The assignment is proving a greater challenge than anticipated: the growing number of dynamics coincides with the current disruptive changes in sectors like energy and mobility, having an impact on the energy and mobility strategies for Transfo and therefor fuelling the need for an even deeper integration.

Solutions offered by the case example

The new governance framework include a set of instruments, which are still under construction. The instruments that are developed are (1) a new organisation chart, (2) a dynamic 3D model of the site to visualise cost allocation and to manage property rights and rights of use and (3) a model for a co-operation agreement between the structural partners of Transfo. Gradually, other complementary instruments will be developed.

The improved organisation chart includes new elements, like the introduction of (a) a consultative body for users, (b) a selection committee evaluating new initiatives on the site, (c) a quality supervision committee and (d) a financial working group. It also suggests improvement of the existing structures, especially the board supervising the quality of architectural and restorative interventions.

The dynamic 3D model is linked to a database, translating the complicated horizontal and vertical structure of owners, tenants and users into one comprehensive visualisation. The model is a preliminary one, in anticipation of a detailed professional model.

The partners are shaping the model for the co-operation agreement, following the political discussions between the municipality of Zwevegem and the Province of West-Flanders.

Building on the sustainable and integrated approach

The implementation of an improved governance model has, in essence, the objective to make it more sustainable and resilient, more integrated (both vertically as horizontally), more flexible and more collaborative. It covers both aspects on macro level (master-planning / strategy) as well as aspects on micro level (How do we renegotiate contract so that current users contribute in maintenance of public spaces? Who will manage collective utilities? How do all the partners and users streamline their communication within the Transfo brand? etc.). The new organisation chart and cost allocation model will offer the tools to manage this kind of questions.

Based on a participatory approach

Inter-municipal organisation Leiedal is elaborating the governance framework, together with the stakeholders from the municipality and the Province, taking into account suggestions from external expert, the Flemish Heritage Agency and users of the site.

Shaping an organisational and financial governance framework typically is not something that is very open to citizens and community participation, because of the high level of technicality of the subject.

It is, however, the objective to include stakeholders in the governance of the site. The user group for instance will discuss both small and big issues and opportunities, coordinating and cooperating with the quality supervision committee, the financial working group, etc. The user group includes amongst others a representative of the housing development, the operator of Transfo Diving, the operator of Transfo Climbing, the event agency responsible for the management of the event halls at Transfo, a representative of the businesses of the New Transfobuilding, etc. The group meets twice a year and in between if necessary. The meetings are also a platform to communicate new initiatives, to align different interests and to resolve dilemmas and conflicts.

What difference has it made? How did the result indicator shift?

The mere fact of working together around a new governance framework and having discussions within the Urbact Local Group entailed a change in mindset of the partners. They all have become aware of the major challenges in managing a complex and multi-user heritage site (which is listed!), avoiding conflicts and streamlining initiatives and opportunities. The real changes will be more tangible once the governance framework is rolled out.

The partners have learned that the framework is not just one but a set of instruments that allow to streamline initiatives and dynamics, to improve integration and final results.

Why should other EU cities use it?

The governance framework (being the set of instruments) might be of interest for the management of (large) heritage sites where there are both different owners and different users. The framework offers / will offer instruments to allocate costs, to keep track of property and user rights, to streamline decision making and communication, to monitor quality, etc.

Taking into account the disruptive changes in the field of energy and mobility (and even the combination of both), the governance structure has to be able to manage an even more complex future. The Transfo partners, for instance, have recently tendered a study examining the introduction of a LECo (Local Energy Community) at Transfo. Transfo has a high concentration of both energy demand (diving tank, houses) and supply (a solar park of about 2.000 panels will be installed on top of the new Transfo parking in 2021).

Key Facts and Figures:

Start and end dates of case example

Start in 2018 – still running

Date of preparation of this case example

2018

Who prepared the case example?

Intermunicipal organization Leiedal is elaborating the governance framework, together with stakeholders from the municipality and the Province, taking into account suggestions from external expert, the Flemish Heritage Agency and users of the site.

Budget

The budget is limited to a commitment of time from each of the partners. A budget is needed for the development of the detailed 3D model, estimated at about 5.000 euros.

Extra information and hyperlinks

Categories
Intercommunale-Leiedal

1. Dealing with architectural heritage in the dynamic context of urban renewal.

Summary

The Kortrijk region has introduced the Action Plan for Architectural Heritage (APAH), an assessment framework for dealing with architectural heritage in the dynamic context of urban renewal. In fact, architectural heritage buildings have intrinsic values ​​and the demolition or thorough renovation implies a reduction of the aesthetic or spatial qualities of the building or its surroundings.

The AHAP allows local authorities to establish a development profile and a locus value for all buildings included in the Flemish Architectural Heritage Inventory. The development profile of the building indicates which future value the building has and which spatial dynamics prevail in its environment. The allocation of the locus value is always a balanced judgement, in which the locus indicators and the development profile provide the arguments.

Solutions offered by the case example

The AHAP is fueled by the Flemish Architectural Heritage Inventory (FAHI), a static inventory with no or few updates and with no appreciation or evaluation of the listed items. Today, the FAHI is the only formal guideline in evaluating building permits for demolishing, renovating or restoring heritage buildings. It goes without saying that local authorities have a hard time discussing these building permits, as the FAHI offers little elements for decision-making. It also puts owners of these buildings in a precarious position, because uncertainty rules.

The AHAP puts an extra layer on top of the FAHI (data enrichment). Where the FAHI mainly focuses on the architectural-cultural properties of the building, the AHAP also addresses urban planning, building physics and aesthetic characteristics of the building, its spatial context and its cultural meaning for the municipality. All these dimensions come together in a locus value. The locus value gives the local authorities the tools for decision-making and quality assurance. It also ensures that the heritage status of the building is clear in advance and is known to all.

The Kortrijk Region

Building on the sustainable and integrated approach

The heritage value is evaluated from two perspectives: (1) from the importance of each individual building in its urban context and (2) from the meaning of its position in the urban development policy. In other words, the importance of the heritage value is evaluated bottom up (based on location visits) and top down (based on the intended urban development policy).

The locus values do not necessarily have a legal status. However, Leiedal recommends that locus values are confirmed by the municipal council and that local authorities set up advisory committees, which can advise individual cases in an independent and respectful manner. By assigning a locus value, local authorities opt for an integrated heritage policy with attention for both the past and the future of their municipality. It supports the development of a contemporary, outstanding, sustainable and qualitative urban environment.

Based on a participatory approach

Communication about architectural heritage policy was also improved, in order to create greater support. The results are poured into a geoportal, intended for citizens, civil servants and policy makers. All owners of architectural heritage buildings are invited to a meetings where the findings are discussed. Leiedal also provides an inspiring publication, made to measure for each municipality, with the examples of qualitative renovations of architectural heritage.

What difference has it made? How did the result indicator shift?

Leiedal has screened and valued about 4.000 buildings since the start of the project in 2016. Each building permit related to architectural heritage buildings is evaluated based on the locus value and development profile. General outcome is a better and more thoughtful preservation of architectural heritage in our municipalities.

Why should other EU cities use it?

The framework is straightforward, easy to use and transferable. The framework offers a solution for the management of those thousands and thousands of heritage buildings which are not listed monuments, but which have a certain value because of building physics, aesthetic characteristics and/or its cultural meaning for the municipality.

Key Facts and Figures:

Start and end dates of case example

Start in 2016 – still running

Date of preparation of this case example

2016

Who prepared the case example?

Intermunicipal organization Leiedal has elaborated this method, based on a framework developed by the Flemish Government Architect, the Department of Architecture Sciences at the University of Ghent and De Smet-Vermeulen Architects. All under the direction of Filip Vanhaverbeke, general manager of Leiedal.

Budget

Municipalities provide about 25 euros per item on the list. This includes preparation, field work, inventory, evaluation proposal, mapping of the geoportal, etc. Inter-municipal organisation Leiedal provides an equal amount for participatory trajectories, different communication moments, the made to measure publication for each municipality, the general maintenance and fee for the geoportal, etc. The regional approach provides benefits of scale for all the municipalities.

Extra information and hyperlinks

https://www.leiedal.be/ruimte-leefomgeving/onroerend-erfgoed/actieplan-bouwkundig-erfgoed (english version)

Example for municipality of Zwevegem:

https://www.zwevegem.be/actieplan-bouwkundig-erfgoed (english version)

https://geocortex.govmaps.eu/html/?viewer=Zwevegem_InventarisBouwkundigErfgoed

https://www.zwevegem.be/sites/zwevegem/files/media/20170918_-_zwe_actieplan_bouwkundig_erfgoed_-_brochure_0.pdf

Categories
Comune-di-Mantova

2. Palazzo Te, Mantova.

Summary

On the 9th of May 2018 the public body “Associazione Centro Internazionale d’Arte e di Cultura di Palazzo Te” has become a private foundation, “Fondazione Palazzo Te”. Through this change a public private partnership was de facto established between the Municipality, owning the palace, and the foundation managing it. Thanks to this governance shift, the management of the pole will become more sustainable for the Municipality. The palace at the moment is undergoing some important restoration work, that will make it more welcoming to visitors and at the same time give new functions to some of the areas, that will be opened to the public for free, or have new business-related activities and host new cultural exhibitions and activities.

Solutions offered:

The project concerning Palazzo Te complex offers a variety of solutions, starting from the restoration works that will renovate the spaces, giving the palace new functions, enhancing and making the pole more welcoming and attractive for visitors and citizens. The creation of a public private collaboration, between the Municipality and the foundation, has made the management of the complex more sustainable and it will ease the burden for the public administration for the following years. The creation of the public private collaboration, based on a multidisciplinary and holistic methodology of the governance and management process of the city, has also encouraged a participatory approach to this action, bringing together citizens, cultural operators and authorities.

Building on the sustainable and integrated approach:

Sustainability in the middle and long term was at the base of the process that resulted in the creation of a public private partnership to manage the structure. As a matter of facts one of the restoration intervention aims at transforming one of the spaces into a bar/bookshop, that could be used by visitors and also citizens, as the area will be opened to the general public, not being part of the museum area anymore. The new business will generate job opportunities, guaranteeing an additional income to the foundation, resulting in a more sustainable model of governance which will reduce the costs for the administration.

Based on a participatory approach:

During the ULG meetings local stakeholders were involved by the Municipality to follow the transition process from public to private subject, finding innovative solutions for the use of spaces. The meetings served as a way to keep updated the Municipality on the change in the management structure of the cultural pole, while the participation of other stakeholders served to promote possible cooperation, animating the spaces with different cultural events. As a matter of facts, one of the restoration interventions aims at transforming the “Fruttiere” into a multi-purpose cultural space that will be used for the cultural productions of the new-born foundation, but mainly by the cultural operators that organise festivals and events in town.

What difference has it made? How did the result indicator shift?

The creation of a public/private collaboration in order to restore and manage the monuments has eased the Municipality both on the administrative and economic aspects, fostering also the civic participation in such a strategic action for the town. So, the action created one new public private partnership in the cultural sector. The restoration works will give back the community at least one space for cultural activities, and at least one new related business activity. It’s still too soon to ascertain the impacts of the action on tourism. The foundation will also be responsible for the design of new cultural productions, high specialisation schools and art shows, as well as opening some of the spaces to the public, making the pole more welcoming for citizens. The Complex will also host a library and study areas for students.

Why should other EU cities use it?

Other EU cities should use this kind of approach as it could give them the opportunity to preserve and restore part of their cultural heritage while avoiding the risk of selling invaluable monuments. The strategy used by the foundation include the opening of part of the museum to the public for free, giving new functions to the spaces that will make the pole more attractive and welcoming for tourists, but mainly for citizens, giving back to the city part of its tradition and cultural heritage. Through this strategy the costs, both economic and of Human Resources, for the public administration will be reduced, while the object of the action remains of public domain with all the advantages for the city related to this aspect.

Key Facts and Figures:

Start and end dates of case example
2016 – 21

Date of preparation of this case example
20/10/18

Prepared by:
Emanuele Salmin

Budget
€ 2.500.000

Extra information and hyperlinks

Categories
Armagh-City

2. Armagh – Former Prison

Summary

Armagh Gaol was established in the late 18th and early 19th century by the former Archbishop of Armagh and primate of Ireland, Richard Robinson. It sits on one end of Armagh’s historic mall and faces another important and rather austere institutional building of the Court House. The court house is still in active use and was designed by local boy Francis Johnston, opening in 1809. The Gaol, designed initially by Thomas Cooley, was much extended in the 1840s by William Murray, but closed in 1988 and has lain vacant ever since. It has been described as a “handsome three-storey fourteen-bay building of coursed conglomerate with rusticated limestone quoins“. Its front block was built in two stages and contains two break-front gabled bays.

To the rear, two cell blocks radiate from a central corridor block, whilst an earlier two-storey infirmary building stands alone in one of the yards. Nineteenth century railings enclose the complex to the front whilst a tall perimeter wall envelopes the other three sides. The building is owned by the local municipality and what will hopefully emerge over the coming years is a mixed-use conservation scheme including sympathetically designed new buildings, with hotel, residential and heritage interpretation uses, and guaranteed public access.

Solutions offered

This solution offers an approach to addressing the challenges of collaborative working between the Public and Private sectors. The Osbourne Group, who have previously refurbished the former prison in Oxford England, have been selected through a competitive process to work collectively with the municipality and the Princes Regeneration Trust, to convert the building into a tourism and accommodation facility that will offer a high quality experience in the city, which currently isn’t on offer.

Building on the sustainable and integrated approach

A significant tourism opportunity lies in wait for Armagh and our ongoing research informs us that the provision of high quality tourism accommodation is absolutely required to enable the city to completely take advantage and capitalise on this opportunity. Armagh has been recently recognised for excellence in the evening and night time economy and is regarded as the religious and ecclesiastical capital of Ireland, drawing significant influences from its Georgian heritage.

This is a product that people will want to see and travel to witness and the provision of a suitable quality of facilities for the city is critical to the continued development of Armagh’s tourism offer and its evening economy. The property in question has been vacant for a number of decades and with every year that passes, falls into even more significant state of disrepair.Addressing this disrepair and creating a meaningful and sustainable use for the property can lead to wider benefits for the city and its population through new jobs and career opportunities.

Based on a participatory approach

The current proposal will be funded by a plethora of funding agencies and has the support of the local community which has been tested at various consultation events. The local business community are supportive of the proposals in principle and appreciate the potential for spinoff benefits to all businesses across the city. The municipality is keen to ensure that all views are taken into consideration thus have been working with the proposed developer to review the existing plans with a view to ensuring that they get maximum support from the community in the immediate area of the Gaol. The Gaol redevelopment is a critical project in Council’s masterplan for the city which was arrived at through a participative approach with a variety of stakeholders.

What difference has it made? How did the result indicator shift?

Restoring old properties and buildings is a very costly activity and in recognition of this, Council and its partners have agreed to fund up to 80% of the costs of the project. Without the funding associated with the project, and the PPP approach championed by the Council, this property will continue to decline with little prospect of securing sustainable and viable uses for it, thus increasing the risk of them eventually being removed from the streetscape.

The Council takes very seriously its duty as a guardian of the important built heritage that has passed through generations in Armagh and this project will enable us to protect and enhance this important building and continue to build on the tourism offer in the city, whilst ensuring that the legacy of Archbishop Robinson is continued.

Why should other EU cities use it?

Restoration of this property will bring multiple benefits to the historic core of Armagh City Centre. Not only will the project address the continued decline of an important Georgian property, the project will create a multi-functional space that will be utilised to host functions (including conferences, seminars and weddings) and play an important role in bringing footfall to this part of the city.

Armagh is a City, like most Northern Ireland cities and towns, that suffered through the Troubles from a damaged reputation and an outflow of people from city centre residential and it appears that this trend is starting to reverse. We are also anticipating that the project will have a fundamental impact on our tourism statistics by increasing not only the number of overnight stays but also the average spend of our visitors which can create new opportunities for prospective entrepreneurs.

Key Facts and Figures:

Date of preparation of this case example: February 2019

Prepared by Shane Kelland

Budget:

The project’s budget is in excess of £ 25m with about 80% of that already in place from various private and public sources. The challenge, in the absence of a functioning Government in Northern Ireland, is in finding the remaining 20% that is needed to realise the project.

Gaol Project

Extra information and hyperlinks

http://armaghgaoltours.com/history.html

Categories
URBACT-IN-Guides

URBACT Programme Guides

In this section you can find others guides related to the URBACTIII Programme that can be of interest.

Categories
Armagh-City

1. The County Club

Challenge: PPP

Summary

Armagh County Club was established in 1869 and has occupied the same premises for the last 149 years. The Club is a private members’ club situated in the centre of the historic city of Armagh, located in the heart of the city’s conservation area. Much of the building is lying vacant or under used and the Club have very exciting new uses for this outstanding property. For instance, the underused snooker room will become a seminar/exhibition space with a new build staircase and kitchen on the blank East gable. The lower ground floor will accommodate two apartments and a new lift will operate from here to the top floor. The Club will celebrate their 150th anniversary in 2019 and it is fitting that the membership has agreed an ambitious programme of improvement works to their property for this important milestone in their history.

Solutions

This solution offers an approach to addressing the challenges of collaborative working between the Public and Private sectors. The ‘private’ partner in this project is a charitable, membership driven and funded organisation with no commercial interests and no core source of income outside of the membership fees. Armagh City, Banbridge and Craigavon Borough Council have been working with the organisation for over 2 years and have proposed a funding and financial assistance package from a common fund that will enable this project to go ahead with a small obligation against the property owner. The project, once completed, will create sustainable income streams for the owner and enable them to invest resources in their charitable activities. Although this project is still in its design and planning stage, we feel as a team that we have learnt some valuable lessons to date. This project is an example of a PPP approach to regeneration although the private partner is quite unlike any of the other private partners that we as a municipality usually work with as they are governed by a Committee and are a voluntary organisation. A more patient iterative approach is required when dealing with this type of group although the end goal has to continue to remain in sharp focus.

Building on the sustainable and integrated approach

A key tenet of the Armagh masterplan is to promote development opportunities that create opportunities for local businesses to grow, expand and develop. We are also committed to addressing the decline of people living in the city centre as we feel that new uses such as residential and evening economy experiential activities can address the continuing decline of traditional town centres exacerbated by the challenging circumstances within the commercial retail sector. With much of the building lying vacant and unused, the property will likely qualify for a higher rate of financial intervention from public funds, effectively reducing the burden on this voluntary organisation to fund the necessary remedial works. The property itself is in a poor state of repair with evidence of cracking in the render, inappropriate repointing work having been carried out and poor condition of rainwater goods. Additionally, the Armagh County Club is run by a committee and ascertaining the appropriate authorisation to proceed with the work has been a challenge and this process of agreeing the way forward with the Committee has taken over 2 years. The Committee is a very conservative group and have required a considerable amount of support to arrive at a positive decision to proceed with this project.

Based on a participatory approach

The partnership that oversees the project is made up of key stakeholders who engage in a collective approach to decision making around the allocation of financial assistance to specific schemes and projects. This contains central and local government, the local business community, the local education sector and representatives from the local community. Heritage, we believe, is a shared participatory approach and we are passionate about ensuring that all key stakeholders are included and engaged in the process of learning about their local heritage and enjoying it. We combine the capital side of the projects with a comprehensive approach to undertaking complementary and educational initiatives to reinforce this common and collective shared approach to heritage.

What difference has it made? How did the result indicator shift?

Restoring old properties and buildings is a very costly activity and in recognition of this, Council and its partners in the Heritage Lottery Fund, have established a common fund which will support the property owners within the city to undertake much needed refurbishment works to properties such as Armagh County Club. Without the funding associated with the project, and the PPP approach championed by the Council, these properties will continue to decline with little prospect of securing sustainable and viable uses for them, thus increasing the risk of them eventually being removed from the streetscape. The Council takes very seriously its duty as a guardian of the important built heritage that has passed through generations in Armagh and this scheme will enable us to

Why should other EU cities use it?

Restoration of this property will bring multiple benefits to the historic core of Armagh City Centre. Not only will the project address the continued decline of an important Georgian property, the project will create a multi-functional space that will be utilised to host functions (including conferences, seminars and weddings) and play an important role in bringing footfall to this part of the city. Armagh is a City, like most Northern Ireland cities and towns, that suffered through the Troubles from an outflow of people from city centre residential and it appears that this trend is starting to reverse. The provision of high quality residential accommodation as part of this scheme will assist in this reversal as evidence suggests that the poor standard of accommodation in the city still deters the take up of residential space locally. The income generated from these undertakings will be used to further the charitable work of the County Club and the finished building will remain the home of this important organisation for the future.

Key Facts and Figures:

Project commenced in 2017 and will complete in 2020

Date of preparation of this case example: December 2018

Prepared by Shane Kelland

Budget

The budget for the restoration is £500,000 of which the municipality and partner founders will contribute approximately 60%, requiring the Club Committee to fund 40% of the costs of restoration. Subject to planning approval and building control consent, works will be commenced in early 2019 and finished in 2020. Council’s Towns-cape Heritage Project Manager will oversee the project as it develops and will have an advisory role in supporting the Committee as they undertake the regeneration of this historic property.

Extra information and hyperlinks

http://www.armaghcountyclub.org A

Categories
Baena

2. Co-creating solutions for the sustainable management of Baena Castle.

Challenges:

– Fostering the integrated approach

– Involving local stakeholders

Summary

The Castle of Baena is an important historical resource of the city which has undergone an important range of structural interventions. Taking place from 2005 to 2015, they have returned the Castle to its original volume, therefore creating new spaces. The lack of resources since then has compromised the completion of the improvement actions, being also necessary to define more in detail the monument use and management model.

Between 2017 and 2018, within the framework of the INT-HERIT project, there has been a participatory process in which some solutions for these outstanding needs have been designed. In addition, some pilot actions have been tested and some technical reports, a proposal for a regulation of uses for the monument and several communication materials have been developed. All of it has contributed to helping local decision makers in the municipality to build up a new integrated strategy for the Castle.

Solutions offered

The implemented interventions together with the described participatory process highlight the important role of the municipality in terms of ‘heritage management’, which is not exempt from shortcomings or difficulties, specially considering the case of small cities. The civil engineering works, to a value of more than EUR 4.000.000, was possible owing to financial support from the Ministry of Public Works and Transport for 75% of the total project cost. The economic crisis and the need to offer more sustainable solutions to the management model have fostered the introduction of this participatory approach which, together with the technical proposals and the pilot activities, have brought useful results to answer these needs. This has determined the design of new solutions that while complementary or alternative, have facilitated the decision making process and the implementation of the preferred solutions among the proposed ones.

Sustainable and integrated approach

The City of Baena, as the owner of the monument, has been responsible for the organisation of this interventions, ensuring the necessary vertical integration with other concerned institutions such as the Ministry of Public Works and Transport and the Andalusian Regional Government Department for Culture, as well as the integration of several local departments and services. Likewise, the intervention of local stakeholders has also been facilitated through three specific sessions of the Local Urbact Group from the INT-HERIT Project and a peer review session on the Castle with the participation of all the transnational partners of the project. Different proposals and instruments for the management of the site have been developed around three different types of measures:

  1. Regulatory framework proposal developing some public use activities.
  2. Possible temporary adaptation for the use of the basement floor.
  3. Integrated management models for the site (including a Spa or other uses).

Based on a participatory approach

Together with the members of the Urbact Local Group and the international participants during the transnational meeting of the INT-HERIT project held in Baena, professionals and political representatives of the Council have been invited to participate in this process as well as other stakeholders who have been consulted and involved to various degrees. Thus, private entrepreneurs involved in the implementation of the civil engineering works, as well as in testing some other occasional activities (concerts, photo reports, cultural events, gastronomic tastings…) have actively participated. At the same time, some professionals have taken part in the design of new projects and reports and also some cultural associations and groups have organised different activities connected to this heritage site.

Difference that has occurred. Changes in the results indicator.

The main difference has to do with the preservation and conservation of the site itself as well as the integration and revitalisation of the surrounding area.

The necessary cultural endowment and a proposal for a rich, flexible and differentiated range of uses have been defined on the basis of the analysis of necessities, viability and risks, all through a participatory approach.

The testing of some pilot activities has allowed a suitability and feasibility evaluation to decide on a future systematic implementation.

Regulatory proposals for activities and services have been created and discussed, considering complementarity, management needs, costs and prices, among other management elements.

Significant progress has been made in the citizen dynamics of esteem, identity and appropriation of the cultural heritage of the municipality.

Interest to be used by other European cities

Problems in cultural heritage management are common to small and medium-sized European cities, from making decisions regarding investment to the management model or the public use strategy.

The case highlights the importance and the opportunity to promote participatory processes no matter the moment in the project’s life cycle.

Furthermore, it proves the interest in adding new innovative initiatives in a flexible and complementary manner, allowing for the redirection of the initial plans when these are proved unfeasible or unsustainable.

A cocktail of simple regulatory rules for public use combined with small pilot actions and the development of basic technical reports, as well as effective communication proposals can contribute to the launching, even if temporary, of resources that require complex and costly interventions.

Main facts and figures

  • Intervention area: 4250 m2
  • Working meetings and participatory meetings:
  • Technical documents: 1. Use and requirements Plan of Baena Castle (support study for the work of the Local Group, developed by the Technical Architect, Angela De Las Morenas) 2. Peer Review Report from Kick off Meeting in Baena, INT-HERIT Project (Sept.2017) 3. Report on proposals from ULG meetings 27/11/17, 24/01/18 and 21/03/18 4. Report that contains several proposals for the regulation of cultural, social and tourist uses of Baena Castle, and the corresponding public prices.
  • Awards: Best architectural project of the year in the category “Architecture + Preservation” of the prestigious Architizer A+ Awards 2017
  • Some communication resources generated: * Video about the Castle produced by Baena City Council and the Córdoba province council. * Video ‘ Popular voices’ about the Castle, produced by the INT-HERIT Project.

Starting and ending dates

January 2017 – December 2018

Preparation date of this Case Example

December 2018

Responsible for its preparation

Technical Team supporting the INT-HERIT Project. Baena City Council

Budget

Investment in civil works: EUR 4.177.094,9 (75% Ministry of Public Works and Transport and 25 % Baena City Council)

Other contributions in the framework of the INT-HERIT Project related to staff costs and technical reports.

Additional information and links

https://architizer.com/projects/restauration-of-the-castle-of-baena-cordoba-spain/

http://patrimoniohistorico.fomento.es/detalleProyecto.aspx?e=01690

http://patrimoniohistorico.fomento.es/detalleProyecto.aspx?e=01907

Categories
Baena

1. Developing Public Private Partnerships

ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE OF TORREPAREDONES, THE COOPERATION BETWEEN DIFFERENT ACTORS AS THE BASIS FOR SHARED MANAGEMENT MODELS.

Summary

Torreparedones is an Ibero-Roman city that currently occupies more than 10 hectares in the municipality of Baena and, in less extension, the municipality of Castro del Río. In the last fifteen years, the City Council of Baena has bought the area of the site that is currently included in the Archaeological Park from its previous private owners. At the same time, the Council has also led, in collaboration with other institutional actors, a successful process of research, conservation and enhancement not exempt from challenges regarding these objectives and in general to the management mechanisms. The recent discovery by researchers of the University of Cordoba of a Roman amphitheater has promoted further research and excavation works where public-private-social cooperation has proved to be successful and can so be a reference for future stable mechanisms of shared management by a wide network of stakeholders.

Solutions offered by the case example

The first solution points out that it is essential having access to technology that facilitates archaeological research works in an efficient way, such as the orthophoto provided by LIDAR flights.

Secondly, it is highlighted that research, from an integrated approach, must be the basis for actions related to the management of heritage sites, before making decisions regarding the actions, investments and management mechanisms to be implemented.

Thirdly, the Case emphasizes the need to have collaboration between public, private and social actors in order to guarantee the sustainability of actions over time, so that they are not abandoned or fail as unsustainable initiatives carried out without this multiplicity of actors.

Finally, a small but essential and successful action such as the one described is not only necessary to confirm the very existence of the heritage resource, but also because it allows, as a specific experience, to extract useful learning in terms of the model to be extrapolated to other scales, problems or contexts.

Sustainable and integrated approach

The sustainability of interventions in this cultural heritage, as wide as it is in need of resources and management mechanisms, should follow a process like the one described, in a simple way, through this Case Example. A process initiated with research and the consequent production of knowledge under the support of multiple agents, thus offering a basis upon which to plan future interventions, their implementation and follow-up.

On its small scale, these first initiatives offer defined, sustained solutions, preferably from a flexibility perspective, adjusted to the real capacity of the actors, times and available resources.

In the case of Torreparedones, the integration of this specific action in the Amphitheater, whatever its future projection, should have an impact on the already outdated Master Plan of the site which needs to be updated and to include management tasks and public uses that go beyond the mere archaeological intervention at the origin of this Plan.

Based on a participatory approach

Women as an active part in the work done in Torreparedones

The main actors involved, in the context of the described Example Case, are mentioned below:

  • University of Córdoba (UCO): researchers, professors, scholars, students
  • External professionals: Santiago Rodero (contracted external Archaeologist) and Massimo Gasparini (Archaeologist and Doctor hired by the UCO, Torreparedones research project).
  • Carlos León, owner of the land.
  • Baena City Council: contracts for support staff and organization of the VII Practical archaeology Course, together with the UCO.
  • City Council of Castro del Río, contract for the geophysical prospection work on the Amphitheater, carried out by the Andalusian Institute of Geophysics (University of Granada).
  • Luis Carrillo de Sotomayor Local High School (Baena): Support in the excavation work by students of archaeology.

Difference that has occurred. Changes in the results indicator

The main difference has to do with the very evidence of the discovery of the amphitheater, taking into account what it represents in heritage, cultural and socioeconomic terms.

On the other hand, the professional intervention of the researchers and the academic university institution (UCO) directing and coordinating the action represents a logical, sustainable and scientific role for the subsequent possible future measures to take on the site.

The private collaboration on the part of the owner of the land, undoubtedly necessary to implement this first intervention on the site, is noteworthy and constitutes a relevant fact that should also serve to deepen and maintain this spirit of cooperation in the future.

The participation of two municipalities together with the cooperation of local actors in the case of Baena – workers and teachers and students of IES Luis Carrillo de Sotomayor High School – underscore the importance of the Torreparedones site for the local community of this municipality and its City Council.

Interest to be used by other European cities

The need to base the management of cultural heritage resources on sustainable models is evident. Given the wealth and abundance of these resources in European contexts, together with the limited means with which to address comprehensive interventions, the cooperation between actors is critical, both in its early stages and in successive planning, implementation and follow-up phases.

In the specific case of archaeological sites, the feasibility and necessary efficiency of intervention and management programmes can be cleverly guided from the start by means of small-scale actions such as the one described, capable of establishing limits, prudently orienting investments and feeding strategies of cooperation between the actors that can be very satisfactory for an integrated and sustainable development of archaeological assets.

Main facts and figures

“For the Roman city of Torreparedones, the discovery of the amphitheater reinforces the idea of its colonial status.” There is only proof of the survival of the amphitheater in eight cities of the Roman Andalusia. Regarding its dating, evolution and role in the context of the city of Torreparedones and its surroundings, the analysis in course will offer the first results, in the same way that it will guide the future evolution of actions for conservation, enhancement or management.

Undoubtedly, this is a finding that has a very positive impact on the value and positioning of the archaeological site in the areas of heritage and the cultural, social and economic uses associated with it. A simple analysis of the media impact of the announcement of the discovery highlights this fact.

Work in progress in the Archaeological Park

Starting and ending dates

We limit in time as a practical way to simplify the story-telling of this Case Example, two moments that facilitate this goal, while also bearing in mind the context of the general object of study, a broader temporal process connected with the discovery and works taking place in the whole of the site and those related to research, conservation and enhancement of the amphitheater, that will be defined in the short and medium term.

In relation to the works subject of the described Case, we consider they begin during the year 2016, with the publication of a scientific article by the researcher Antonio Monterroso-Checa, where he presents the process for the amphitheater identification. At the time of writing this text (November 2018), different research works are still ongoing. After the appropriate analysis, they will offer a basic level of results and recommendations for the subsequent definition of research, conservation and / or enhancement actions.

Activity that took place in Torreparedones

Preparation date of this Case Example

November 2018

Responsible for its preparation

INT-HERIT Project Team – City Council of Baena

Budget

Taking into account the nature of the ad hoc collaboration in this initiative, a joint budget is not available. In addition, in some cases there have been professional or social collaborations in the form of academic work or volunteer work, difficult to quantify in economic terms.

In any case, contributions of one kind or another and the responsible actors in each case can be mentioned:

  • University of Córdoba: professors, scholars, students and researchers. Contract of external professionals for the work of excavation and analysis of results.
  • Carlos León, owner of the land: permission to carry out the study visits and excavations.
  • Baena City Council: contracts for technical assistants to collaborate in the excavation tasks.
  • City Council of Castro del Río: contract for the geophysical prospecting of the site carried out by the Andalusian Institute of Geophysics of the University of Granada.
  • Luis Carrillo de Sotomayor High School (Baena): support in the tasks of excavation by Archaeology students.

Additional information and links

  • Márquez, C., Ventura, A., Morena, J.A. and De la Llave, R. (2014). Torreparedones -Baena, Córdoba-, archaeological research. Cordoba
  • Monterroso-Checa, Antonio (2017). Remote sensing and archaeology from Spanish LIDAR-PNOA: Identifying the Amphitheater of the Roman city of Torreparedones (Córdoba-Andalucía- Spain). Mediterranean Archaeology and Archaeometry. Vol 17, no1, pp.15-22
  • Media (summary). Impact of the discovery announcement:

https://sevilla.abc.es/andalucia/cordoba/sevi-existe-anfiteatro-romano-junto-yacimiento-torreparedones-baena-201611221816_noticia.html

https://arqueologiaenred.paleorama.es/2016/11/descubren-importantes-indicios-de-un.html

https://www.uco.es/investigacion/ucci/uconews/item/2125-torreparedones-ya-tiene-anfiteatro-romano

https://www.lavanguardia.com/local/sevilla/20180521/443749193187/inician-las-excavaciones-para-buscar-el-anfiteatro-romano-de-torreparedones.html

https://www.diariocordoba.com/noticias/cordobaprovincia/excavacion-torreparedones-saca-luz-restos-anfiteatro_1232341.html

Categories
Articles

Cahors is experimenting with participatory approaches

Cahors will host the eight cities of the Int Herit network at a meeting that will take place from February 2019, 19 to 22. It will be the opportunity for Cahors to highlight the mobilization of its Urbact Local Group around the revitalization of Château-du-Roi Street.

Cahors’ urban planning and economic development policy relies on the wealth of its built heritage. Called “Cahors, Heart of the Agglomeration”, the urban strategy deployed since 2008 considers that a strong and lively centrality is needed to better support the entire territory and its vital forces that depend upon it. In this context, Cahors works in particular to requalify, preserve and enhance its historic center. To do this, the City has prioritized certain areas of the historic center, especially Château-du-Roi Street and its neighborhood.

Château-du-Roi Street housed shops and artisans from the Middle Ages until the 70s. It is a major axis of the historic center, much used by residents, tourists, visitors, shoppers… Since that flourishing period, however, the street has become less and less lively. There is now a real urgency to act, to preserve and enhance the built heritage, bring families back into housing adapted to modern living conditions, redevelop again various activities (economic, associative, collaborative …) and make all uses coexist better.

The rue du Château-du-Roi as a playground

The elected officials have thus identified this street as one of the levers of revitalization for the city center, and it has become the laboratory to test the tools of the urban strategy in order to better adapt them to other neighborhoods and the surrounding towns.

Several studies have been carried out on this street by national organizations to find solutions for the development of ommercial activities for example, or to imagine a new future for the former state prison, the Palace of Via. In addition, the inhabitants of the street were involved in a preliminary participatory approach during the first European Heritage Biennale (November 2016), which allowed concrete needs to emerge, notably to test the pedestrianization of the street. .

Anticipating the redevelopment of the street to be engaged in 2018 – 2019, the City of Cahors seized the opportunity presented the European network Int Herit to work on the revitalization of the street by mobilizing the stakeholders as part of an experimental participatory approach. The Urbact Local Group of Cahors (ULG) was created at the end of the winter of 2018. Made up of inhabitants, tradesmen and other professionals, it is animated by a multidisciplinary team of technicians from the City of Cahors, the Grand Cahors and the CAUE*, under the political leadership of an elected representative.

At first, the objective was to choose the main themes of reflection. Then a collective intelligence workshop opened up all the fields of possibilities to explore what could be done, what the inhabitants wanted to see emerge, but also to identify concerns or difficulties. This allowed, after four meetings, to involve them in the construction of the specifications developed for the redevelopment of the street by our administrations. They identified specific needs, including green spaces, new street lighting, new street paving… that will be incorporated into the project.

This global redevelopment is planned for 2019. It will be conducted by an architect which will associate the ULG in the definition of the program. When the transnational meeting will take place next February, the ULG will have met him and started working on the program, and the implementation schedule with the architect.

Experimentation, then sustainability

These first workshops also allowed one of the members of the ULG, a private investor who is renovating a building with the support of local government, to review the way in which she planned to restore her building: she decided to open its facade on the street, following discussions at the stakeholders workshop.

Finally, the ULG continues, alongside the street improvement project, to brainstorm new ideas for the revitalization of the street. Events are currently being considered and may be the subject of joint work with partners of Int Herit network during the transational meeting (peer review).

Thanks to the Urbact 3 program and the Int Herit network, the City of Cahors has been able to train its technicians to enable them to use participatory approaches that have become indispensable in the elaboration of public policies. Elected officials will also undergo training early next year. This capacity building, implemented concretely and simultaneously with ULG Cahors, wil allow the administration to develop a method that can be reused on future projects.

* CAUE : Council of architecture, urbanism and environment.

A little text to present Cahors

Cahors: a rich and diverse heritage

Capital of the Lot Department, in the north of the Occitania Region, in the South West of France, Cahors has 20,000 inhabitants. Labeled ‘City of art and history’ (an important national label), it has a particularly rich and preserved heritage, both tangible and intangible, which constitutes its identity: built heritage, including two buildings listed in the World Heritage list by UNESCO (Valentré bridge and Saint-Etienne Cathedral) as part of Santiago of Compostela pilgrimage route, natural heritage with landscapes, gastronomy, art of living, culture…

View of the city of Cahors